to the power of

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(Source: clayzmama.com)

dragondicks:

cupsnake:

Pepper and friends explore where no chickens have gone before as far as she knows in her nugget box space ship. Tiny pretend space explorers!

these chicken nuggets are fucking raw get me the manager

warriorchicken:

I look like an extremely professional fashionable woman in an Abaya. It probably took me AGES to look this professional right?image

WRONG. I’m actually wearing my onesie underneath it and you will NEVER KNOW MWAHAHAHA

image

Wanna know another secret? Even though i LOOK like I’m paying attention to whatever nonsense you are saying…..

image

I AM ACTUALLY WEARING HEADPHONES AND LISTENING TO MUSIC

image

  BAM!

Dude the gamecube sucked

Anonymous

(Source: cuidad)

teenage-birtdag:

this makes me so happy right now

teenage-birtdag:

this makes me so happy right now

I thought I had tweeted these but I don’t see them on twitter…so here you guys go. It’s fun to be no fun.

thefrogman:

[video] [h/t: lovelylops]

pizzashrapnelblindness:

growing up i always thought that quicksand was going to be a much bigger problem than it turned out to be

thejunglenook:


So It Turns Out That Monkeys Are Pretty Good At Doing Math
George Dvorsky, io9A recently concluded experiment shows that rhesus monkeys are capable of doing simple addition using numbers 1 through 25. But more interesting than that is the observation that they also make the same mistakes as us.To test whether monkeys can represent and manipulate numbers in their head, neurobiologist Margaret Livingstone of Harvard Medical School and her colleagues set up a rather interesting experiment.Prior to this, however, the monkeys learned to associate the Arabic numbers 0 through 9 and 15 select letters with the values zero through 25. This was done by having the monkeys choose larger numbers as a means to acquire greater quantities of a food reward.But for the new experiment, the monkeys had to work a bit harder for it. They had to perform addition in order to correctly choose the larger reward. Specifically, they were given a choice between performing a sum calculation and a single symbol rather than just two single symbols. Eventually, they learned how add the two symbols and compare the sum to a third, single symbol.To rule out the possibility that they were simply memorizing combinations of symbols, the researchers taught the monkeys an entirely new set of symbols. They were still successful, calculating previously unseen sets of combinations.The monkeys weren’t perfect, however. And in fact, they committed an error often exhibited by humans. Aviva Rutkin from New Scientist explains:
The monkeys made more mistakes on problems involving numbers that were close in value – a fact which might ultimately prove more interesting than their success at small numbers. Neuroscientists already know that the human brain is better at distinguishing between two low numbers than two high ones. For example, you could easily tell the difference between two and four birds sitting in a tree, but you’d be less likely to spot the difference between a flock of 22 and a flock of 24. What we don’t know is why. Some think it is because the brain encodes numbers logarithmically, so that we perceive the distance between two small numbers as greater than that between two large ones. Others argue that the brain encodes numbers linearly, as on a number line, but that our concept of a number becomes less distinct as the value increases.
As Rutkin points out, the monkeys were biased towards a linear scale. More insight is likely to emerge if and when monkeys are asked to perform tasks involving multiplication. (io9.com)

 

Journal Reference:Margaret S. Livingstone, Warren W. Pettine, Krishna Srihasam, Brandon Moore, Istvan A. Morocz, and Daeyeol Lee. Symbol addition by monkeys provides evidence for normalized quantity coding. PNAS 2014 : 1404208111v1-201404208. (x)

thejunglenook:

So It Turns Out That Monkeys Are Pretty Good At Doing Math

George Dvorsky, io9

A recently concluded experiment shows that rhesus monkeys are capable of doing simple addition using numbers 1 through 25. But more interesting than that is the observation that they also make the same mistakes as us.

To test whether monkeys can represent and manipulate numbers in their head, neurobiologist Margaret Livingstone of Harvard Medical School and her colleagues set up a rather interesting experiment.

Prior to this, however, the monkeys learned to associate the Arabic numbers 0 through 9 and 15 select letters with the values zero through 25. This was done by having the monkeys choose larger numbers as a means to acquire greater quantities of a food reward.

But for the new experiment, the monkeys had to work a bit harder for it. They had to perform addition in order to correctly choose the larger reward. Specifically, they were given a choice between performing a sum calculation and a single symbol rather than just two single symbols. Eventually, they learned how add the two symbols and compare the sum to a third, single symbol.

To rule out the possibility that they were simply memorizing combinations of symbols, the researchers taught the monkeys an entirely new set of symbols. They were still successful, calculating previously unseen sets of combinations.

The monkeys weren’t perfect, however. And in fact, they committed an error often exhibited by humans. Aviva Rutkin from New Scientist explains:

The monkeys made more mistakes on problems involving numbers that were close in value – a fact which might ultimately prove more interesting than their success at small numbers.

Neuroscientists already know that the human brain is better at distinguishing between two low numbers than two high ones. For example, you could easily tell the difference between two and four birds sitting in a tree, but you’d be less likely to spot the difference between a flock of 22 and a flock of 24.

What we don’t know is why. Some think it is because the brain encodes numbers logarithmically, so that we perceive the distance between two small numbers as greater than that between two large ones. Others argue that the brain encodes numbers linearly, as on a number line, but that our concept of a number becomes less distinct as the value increases.

As Rutkin points out, the monkeys were biased towards a linear scale. More insight is likely to emerge if and when monkeys are asked to perform tasks involving multiplication. (io9.com)

 

Journal Reference:
Margaret S. Livingstone, Warren W. Pettine, Krishna Srihasam, Brandon Moore, Istvan A. Morocz, and Daeyeol Lee. Symbol addition by monkeys provides evidence for normalized quantity coding. PNAS 2014 : 1404208111v1-201404208. (x)

cat-shaming:

This is what happens when I meow at my cat

thepatientlywaitingfox:

she-wants-the-eod:

highball2814:

reverendrevenant:

I could have used this information over the last 29 years of my god damn life

My mom taught me to pack like this and she gets mad when I come to visit and sees that I don’t use it.

I need to remember this for uniforms.

Oh my god, I am learning this ASAP. HOW DID I NOT KNOW OF THIS BEFORE?!

thepatientlywaitingfox:

she-wants-the-eod:

highball2814:

reverendrevenant:

I could have used this information over the last 29 years of my god damn life

My mom taught me to pack like this and she gets mad when I come to visit and sees that I don’t use it.

I need to remember this for uniforms.

Oh my god, I am learning this ASAP. HOW DID I NOT KNOW OF THIS BEFORE?!

(Source: neverforget14)

vortexanomaly:

the crumb

vortexanomaly:

the crumb

(Source: nickholmes)